GoPro's version of hyperlapse grows up a little in the Hero 8. When introduced last year, it was a welcome addition to the tool bag: something between a regular time-lapse and a smooth video, and perfect for condensing longer moments into something more dynamic. But it could be hit or miss. Did you want the 2X setting? The 5X? Or the... you get it. In short, doing math before you walk up a mountain kinda takes you out of the moment. Now, just set it and forget it -- let the camera do the work.
Most GoPro cameras can film in 4K (3840 x 2160), but older models are limited to standard HD (1920 x 1080). Premium models can film in 4K at higher frame rates like 60 frames per second (fps), which results in smoother, more realistic video. If you need superior 4K video quality, you’ll need to look at the more expensive GoPro cameras, but if you need great but not amazing video, you can save a decent amount of money by getting a prior-generation model that records in HD.

Much like Band-Aids or Kleenex, GoPro makes products so good that their brand name is synonymous with the product itself. GoPro’s portable video cameras set the standard for action cameras: they’re durable enough to withstand just about any outdoor activity, they’re easy enough for anyone to use, and they include features typically reserved for far pricier cameras.

Are Gopros waterproof?


GoPro cameras are known for their premium shooting capabilities, but not all of them hold up underwater. Some options are a bit blurry, while others lack great depth. Always ensure the GoPro you take diving is able to shoot as well underwater as it can on land. A bit of quality difference is not the end of the world, but you want your videos to be as clear as possible.
This digital ghost town extends to the mobile app, where, again, you’re given the illusion of having more options than you actually do. For example, put the camera into time-lapse mode and you will see what looks like the option to change the shooting interval. However, bringing up the interval menu reveals the default, 0.5-second option as the only option. It’s the exact same story in burst photo mode: You can open the burst rate menu, but 10 fps is the only setting you’ll find.
Now that you've considered the features of the GoPro cameras and if the price is worth the activities you will be using it for, it is time to figure out which edition you need. The White and Silvers come in only one, so you will have to purchase specific mounts/parts you will need separately (do the math, the Black Editions with the mounts you need & WiFi accessories are a financially smart to purchase instead of a cheaper cam and everything else separately if that's what you  may be doing).
QuikStories is GoPro’s answer to the question of what do you do with all of the footage, time-lapse sequences, and photos you took from your last adventure. To use the feature, you’ll first need to install the additional GoPro Quik app (find it on iOS or Android). Quik can see all of the videos and photos on your phone — whether they were shot on your GoPro or not — and will create an automatic edit that combines them into something easily consumable in your Facebook or Instagram feed. You can set some basics, like the mood and duration, and the app handles the rest.
The built-in screen means the Hero is much more approachable to novice users than the Session cameras were, and it offers the same touch controls as the Hero5/Hero6 Black. Leaving in voice control was also a good move, letting you say things like “GoPro, start recording” while bombing down a hill on your bicycle when you’d rather not take your hands off the handlebars. 

What is a good cheap action camera?


This digital ghost town extends to the mobile app, where, again, you’re given the illusion of having more options than you actually do. For example, put the camera into time-lapse mode and you will see what looks like the option to change the shooting interval. However, bringing up the interval menu reveals the default, 0.5-second option as the only option. It’s the exact same story in burst photo mode: You can open the burst rate menu, but 10 fps is the only setting you’ll find.
I'll admit, I wasn't expecting too much from HyperSmooth when the Hero 7 was revealed. GoPro already added stabilization in the Hero 5, and then an "improved" version of it in the Hero 6, so when it was repackaged in the Hero 7 it was easy to assume it was another incremental upgrade. I was wrong: It was truly impressive and made almost everything shot with it much much better.
Unfortunately, that narrow focus means the Hero goes without all of the advanced features found on higher-end GoPros. This isn’t inherently bad for its target user, but it does mean that experienced users no longer have a lower cost option that will play well with their Hero5 or Hero6 Black cameras. The new Hero doesn’t have the resolution or ProTune settings to match the quality of footage from the other two.
With video shot on your GoPro, you can also assist Quik by using the highlight tag feature, found in both GoPro apps and on the camera itself via the Mode/Highlight. You can tag highlights while recording or during playback, and doing so will make sure Quik knows which portions of your video are important, and will include those moments in the edit.

Frankly, we’re not bothered by the lack of 4K or high frame rates. For what action cameras are typically tasked with, 1080p is just fine — it’s the content that matters, not the pixels. Yes, we enjoy having the option for 4K when it’s there, but if you’re a casual user, you probably don’t need to worry about this. What’s more, 1080p means you can fit more footage onto the same MicroSD card, and it will take up less space on your phone or computer when you transfer it. This isn’t just a positive side-effect; it could be a real advantage for some users — the same users who would choose to set their Hero5 or Hero6 cameras to 1080p mode for this reason.

Do you need a filter for GoPro underwater?


This digital ghost town extends to the mobile app, where, again, you’re given the illusion of having more options than you actually do. For example, put the camera into time-lapse mode and you will see what looks like the option to change the shooting interval. However, bringing up the interval menu reveals the default, 0.5-second option as the only option. It’s the exact same story in burst photo mode: You can open the burst rate menu, but 10 fps is the only setting you’ll find.

underwater cameras

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